Pacific Symphony Launches with Tessitura Ticketing Integration

Congratulations to the team at Pacific Symphony on your beautiful new website!   You can see it here – Pacific Symphony Website

Pacific Symphony sought an entire web presence that could represent their nationwide brand with passion and excitement (in addition to California style).  Pacific Symphony wanted to maximize the user experience by fully integrating custom functions including Tessitura ticketing system.

ARTdynamix™ Enterprise fit that request perfectly.  Thus, DWG collaborated with Pacific Symphony through the entire process and the new web presence launched in December of 2021.  Yay!

As we began developing the Pacific Symphony’s Website, the need for a shopping environment for REST handshake with their Tessitura software in order to replace their existing SOAP based environment.  Having converted other Tessitura clients from SOAP to Rest, we began the task by understanding the way that Tessitura is customized for Pacific Symphony. Tessitura refers to itself as “arts enterprise software”.

It is an enterprise application used by performing arts and cultural organizations to manage their activities in ticketing, fundraising, customer relationship management, and marketing.

As many of you know, Tessitura happens to be amazingly flexible and allows the end user to create their ticketing environment pretty much any which way they care to.   As such, understanding the client ticketing paradigm is essential to creating a great Shopping platform.

We were able to cover the gamut ranging from short flex series with special pricing, to long term category based fixed packages, to group sales, individual tickets, and donations.

 

 

The Vital User Experience

When I (LaMae) do presentations about web design and navigation, the User Interface / User Experience, the discussion is always lively because inherently everyone understands that UI/UX is vital.  I often tell the story of a mirror I installed in our home hallway and how I was so pleased with myself for the handiwork.  Then, I showed my husband who happens to be taller than me,  his head was chopped off and I realized the great job I had done would only work for me … or those very close to being the same height as me.  Missed the mark on that one.

A simple UI problem

Paper Towel Dispenser with sign

This picture is a  more analog example of the user experience.  Imagine how many folks had difficulty using this paper towel dispenser for someone to have taken time to make and tape up an additional explanation?   My experience was just as confusing.  I read the sign, “PLACE HAND RIGHT BELOW THE GREEN LIGHT …” but the green button was nowhere to be found unless you moved your hand under the dispenser, and then it was intermittent.  Most of us would eventually figure this out and frankly, it is only an annoyance, but how many people are choosing someone else because of an annoyance?

UI/UX on your site

The user interface (page design including the look and its ease of use), as well as the user experience (how do the site pages flow work together to get things done), should be the primary, or at least one of the primary planning considerations.  Can the visitor find what they want, is it aesthetically pleasing, can they/will they buy?  These questions are your goals (or should be).  There are probably others, too.

If someone wants to buy – let them.  Heck – make it easy for them.

Finally, this brings me to Quality Assurance.  Check your site (or paper towel holder) based on real users and not your own expectations and assumptions and minimize annoyances.

 

How can we help? E-commerce? Virtual Interaction? Questions?

Now is not the time to profit – so please know in advance that our consultations will be free and our pricing will be at sustainable rates for our team.

DWG understands how dramatically your business/life/business-life have changed in the last few weeks and perhaps, minute-by-minute.  Perhaps we can help….24/7.

Do you need online access to your business such as selling products online, updating your clients, hosting your digital messages?  DWG will brainstorm and implement promptly.  We stand ready to be your digital support whether you are a long-time client or someone with a new need.  Let’s talk.

Phone:  818.610.3316
Email:  dreambig@dreamwarrior.com
Top Software Companies in Los Angeles

LaMae and Nami

Cowpath Website Navigation

We’ve all heard the experts and read the articles about the best way to set up your web’s information design. Graphics, detailed menus, right navigation, left navigation, heat maps, intuitive, topical, functional – STOP STOP STOP.

I propose Cow-Path navigation design.  Behnam Ataee, CTO of Dream Warrior Group, Inc. shows his expertise every day when designing and implementing the information design on web sites from The Arts to E-Commerce. He consults with clients about their goals, researches and then uses his knowledge of user behavior to design the best possible initial site navigation.

But is that enough? I say it’s the ideal and necessary start but we can’t stop there. This is where observation and analytics come in to the picture. Now that we have a logical and amazing looking navigation, we need to see what happens. Because (and I know this is a shock), people don’t always act logically. As marketers and developers, we need to see what is happening – figure out why and if we can and adopt the navigation schema to behavior.

Certainly, we still want to design a site that funnels folks to the desired end… But they may have a better way to get there. Or, it may not be better but it was they want… give them what they want.

As I was discussing this with our new friend and client, John Olchak from The The San Diego Repertory Theatre, he likened it to landscape designers who don’t put in the concrete sidewalks until they see where people are making their own paths. Smart. I recalled my college days at UWSP. Outside the Science and Natural Resources building there were signs saying ‘Don’t make cow-paths!” because the student body was forever cutting corners and tearing up the grass (I confess to nothing). For the record, good design is not making paths for students that involve any amount of extra steps from the library to the business building.

So, with Web site navigation I say “Let’s embrace the cow-paths”. Check out your analytics how are people getting to your desired goal/conversion? Can we make that navigation easier and more enticing for others? So, don’t ever pour concrete on your web site. Leave the navigation open to change to match the cow-path or add a second path. Keep it simple, clean and give the visitors what they want.
Now… are your visitors not converting or choosing to make a path to your goal page? That’s another blog and conversation about goals, page content and ease of conversion. We’ll talk soon.

Mooo